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Vitamins and Minerals FAQs

Vitamins and Minerals

 


Before taking any supplement it's important to talk to your healthcare provider or Registered Dietitian to discuss your individual needs.

 





1. Will vitamin and mineral supplements give you energy?

No. The energy that your body needs to think, work and play comes from calories. Vitamins and minerals in pill form do not provide calories. Calories come from the foods we eat.


2. Can vitamin and mineral supplements reduce stress?

No. Vitamin and mineral supplements don't reduce stress but eating well is one strategy that may help you cope with the stresses of daily living. A supplement will only provide some missing nutrients if you are not eating well. If you are feeling stressed it's important to find out the causes of your stress and get help from a health professional if needed.


3. Should I take vitamin and mineral supplements to make sure that I am getting what I need or give them to my kids when they don’t eat right?

Not necessarily. You and your family can get the nutrients you need by following the recommendations in Canada's Food Guide. Vitamin and mineral supplements do not provide the benefits of food such as fibre, carbohydrate, fat, protein and calories. If you’re concerned about whether you or your children are getting enough nutrients, speak to your healthcare provider or Registered Dietitian.


4. Who should consider taking a supplement?

Here are some situations that may require a supplement. Remember, if you are concerned about your nutrient intake or think you may need a supplement, speak to your healthcare provider or Registered Dietitian.

  1. Women of childbearing age who are thinking of getting pregnant should take a supplement that contains at least 400 ug (0.4 mg) of folic acid. This is to prevent neural tube defects such as spina bifida that can begin early in pregnancy even before many women realize they are pregnant.
  2. Women who are pregnant need added folic acid and iron, which can be obtained from foods and with a multivitamin.
  3. Men and Women over the age of 50 should consider vitamin D and vitamin B12 supplements. Canada's Food Guide recommends a daily supplement of 400 IU of Vitamin D for both men and women over the age of 50. Also, adults over 50 may not be able to fully absorb vitamin B12 that occurs naturally in foods and should take a supplement.
  4. People who don’t drink milk or who drink less than 2 cups (500 mL) of milk or fortified soy beverage daily may need a vitamin D and/or calcium supplement. 
  5. Vegetarians or Vegans. A well planned vegetarian or vegan diet will meet most nutrient needs. Vegans may need a source of vitamin B12 either from a supplement or foods fortified with vitamin B12. They may also benefit from a calcium and vitamin D supplement.
  6. People with medical conditions. Some conditions such as anemia or osteoporosis may need more of some nutrients. Or if you’ve had surgery or an infection you may require extra nutrients or a supplement until you regain your health.
  7. People with very restricted diets, such as those with poor appetite, very low calorie diet or food allergies may need a supplement.
  8. People who smoke. Smoking increases the need for vitamin C. People who smoke should take a vitamin C supplement and eat vitamin C rich foods.


5. Can supplements be dangerous?

Sometimes. A single daily multivitamin is usually safe.  However, some vitamins and minerals are dangerous when taken in large amounts if you take them as single nutrient supplements. For example, high intakes of vitamin A during pregnancy have been linked to birth defects. Also, vitamin D, niacin, calcium, iron and selenium are toxic in high doses.

For some supplements, if you take too much, you may experience unpleasant side effects. For example, having over 2000 mg of vitamin C may cause stomach problems like diarrhea. Large amounts of vitamin B6 and fluoride also have harmful side effects. Speak to your healthcare provider or Registered Dietitian if you have any nutritional concerns or questions before taking any supplements.


6. Can taking a vitamin A or beta-carotene supplement help prevent cancer?

No. It is not recommended that vitamin A or beta-carotene supplements be used to prevent cancer. In fact, research has shown that in some cases, taking these supplements can increase the risk of some types of cancer.


7. Can taking vitamin C, zinc or selenium supplements boost my immunity?

Almost all nutrients help the immune system in one way or another. Some research suggests that vitamin C, zinc and selenium may make your immune system stronger. For most people, however, there is no good evidence that taking more of these nutrients than what you can get from a healthy diet will improve your immune system.

It’s best to check with your healthcare provider before taking any supplements. Both zinc and selenium can be toxic in high doses, and taking more than 2,000 mg of vitamin C per day can have side effects like diarrhea.


8. Can some nutrients delay or prevent dementia?

No. Several nutrients have been studied to see if they can help prevent dementia. These include antioxidants (such as vitamins A, C and E), B vitamins, and omega-3 fatty acids. Currently there is not enough evidence that shows that taking vitamin and mineral supplements will prevent dementia. 


9. Can taking a vitamin E supplement help prevent cancer or heart disease?

No. It is not recommended that you take a vitamin E supplement to help prevent chronic diseases like heart disease or cancer. In fact, some research has shown that in certain individuals (such as those who already have had heart disease, cancer or diabetes), high doses of vitamin E supplements can actually cause harm. More research is needed to know how vitamin E supplements can affect the risk of chronic disease.  Always speak with your doctor before starting a vitamin E supplement.

The amount of vitamin E found in a multivitamin is considered safe and appropriate for healthy individuals.

You may also be interested in:

Vitamin C

Vitamin A

Vitamin E

Do I need a vitamin or mineral supplement?, Dietitians of Canada

If you’d like information on a vitamin or mineral that is not on this list, call 1-877-510-510-2 or send an email.

 

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Dietitians of Canada acknowledges the financial support of EatRight Ontario by the Ontario government. The views expressed do not necessarily reflect those of the Province.